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'Face masks' by Jan Nolan of Richmond upon Thames U3A

'Face masks' by Jan Nolan of Richmond upon Thames U3A

I bought the material and made a 9 x 7 pattern sewed inside out attaching elastic leaving a small gap to turn back right side. Once turned right side making pleats and sewing over pleats.

'Glass Rainbow' by Barbara Prater of East Berwickshire U3A

'Glass Rainbow' by Barbara Prater of East Berwickshire U3A

5 years ago I took up a new hobby. Making "Stained glass". I love the colour of old blue glass bottles and so thought it would be an interesting hobby. I turned up at the community centre where a number of 'old hands' were already engaged in composing beautiful pictures of flowers and patterns. After an hour sitting with an uncut bit of glass in one hand and a glass cutter in the other - I realised that it is more complicated than it looks. However I am now reasonably competent, and my veg box delivery lady asked if I would make her a rainbow the same as the one I had made for myself and was hanging in my window.... so I can't be too bad.

'Quilt' by Jacki Hebblethwaite of Yate & Sodbury District U3A

'Quilt' by Jacki Hebblethwaite of Yate & Sodbury District U3A

As a quilter I was born for lockdown. Despite two rooms dedicated to quilting, my fabric stash still migrated to every room in the house. My plan for lockdown was to make or finish a project every day. How easy is that! Too busy to cook, clean or embark on any perilous activity around the house, my days have been spent walking the dogs and then getting stuck into sewing. Together with other members of our quilting group - remotely for course - we made for the hospitals, for the elderly, for disadvantaged children, for baby animals in Australia and made a huge numbers of Morsbags which are given away to avoid using plastic bags. Christmas presents are made as are fabric gift bags to put them in, our sofas are awash with new cushions and as for bags - how many does a gal need?? We have a new baby coming to the family in September so here is his first playmat. Living in Cornwall, the family will love the coastal theme as much as I enjoyed making it. I wonder if he would like another for Christmas?

'Stay At Home Quilt Piece' by Mary Pearce of Barnet U3A

'Stay At Home Quilt Piece' by Mary Pearce of Barnet U3A

The Upcycling Group is to make a quilt of our pieces when the lockdown is over. This is just once piece

'Toy Cat' by Steph Collins of Seaham & District U3A

'Toy Cat' by Steph Collins of Seaham & District U3A

I made this for my granddaughter. I sent for the pattern and the wool online; it's an old Woman's Weekly pattern. It's actually the first knitted toy that I've made. I'm still learning the knitting so had some new things to learn.

'Crotchet Rainbows' Karen Thorley of Sandbach & District U3A

'Crotchet Rainbows' Karen Thorley of Sandbach & District U3A

I made this for our baby granddaughter who loves bright colours. We currently haven't seen her since she was 8 weeks old before lockdown began as they live a long way off. The hearts are knitted, I did them in one flat piece side to side, repeated that and then folded them over, stuffed lightly and crocheted around to join. Then I crocheted name letters to personalise. The rainbows and clouds are crocheted, really easy with just a bit of experimentation. I then strung them on a padded hanger.

'Scarecrow Family' by June Simpson of Saltburn District U3A

'Scarecrow Family' by June Simpson of Saltburn District U3A

used an old knitting book pattern. now charity shops are open they can often be bought cheaply , or found online. you are never too old to learn and once you can knit you never forget. it helps take your mind from worries as you follow patterns and create new items. The last time I did any knitting was when my two sons, (now 54 and 48}, were still at school. So, you could say I was a bit rusty. Knitting needles and patterns had gone to a charity shop years ago, however I joined a knitting group but got bored with the time it took to knit a jumper. When sorting a cupboard, I came across a pattern book of a family scarecrows that had missed the clear out. Early lock down, I began with the baby, as she was the smallest and because I enjoyed it, I continued with knitting the whole family - 7 in total. I created adornments - grandad has a snail in his hat and a medal, grandma a ladybird and a rolled-up umbrella with a large patch - each member has an addition. Nothing takes long so I don’t get bored and the end result is charming. I have since knit a rabbit to complete the set. I am an active member of the U3A garden group and we met at our garden to have a photoshoot as it seemed an appropriate place for my family to live and play. After lockdown they will go to the local hospice who cared for my son and I will be continuing with my newly started again hobby. So my message would be never think its too late to start again.

'Quilt' by Louise Matlock of Islington U3A

'Quilt' by Louise Matlock of Islington U3A

At the start of lockdown, I decided to set myself a challenge to make quilts for Project Linus (https://projectlinusuk.org.uk/). I've done lots of crafts and sewing, but never really got down to patchwork quilting, so it was a learning process! the Project is particularly keen to have quilts for boys as most people prefer to make flowery ones. I incorporated trains, light houses and dolphins into some of mine. I've now made 6 and have moved on to crochet blankets, which is more of a comfort zone for me. So I'm making a sea coloured, wave patterned blanket and will make starfish, turtles etc to sew on to it.

'Lockdown Landscape' by Frances Owen of Haxby & Wigginton U3A

'Lockdown Landscape' by Frances Owen of Haxby & Wigginton U3A

Our Craft Group is in suspension but we continue to work at home and send photos to our Craft Leader. Here is my Lockdown Landscape, reflecting a longing to be out and about in the countryside during lockdown. It is known as a Hooky, using lengths of recycled material looped through a hessian backing, so simple and effective and a great way of using old teeshirts and odd yarns. A new take on the art of rag rugging.

'Patchwork' by Susan Tricklebank of Northampton U3A

'Patchwork' by Susan Tricklebank of Northampton U3A

This patchwork creation was intended to be a cot cover for my son 31 years ago. For some unknown reason I abandoned it, only to rediscover it in a cupboard a few weeks ago, and I became re-enthused. The original pieces were bought at Laura Ashley, and I was able to find additional similar pieces on the Etsy website. I am really enjoying the creative process. It will now be made into a double bed cover.